sovietjewry:

The Jewish Autonomous Region by D. Bergelson (1939)

A pamphlet about the “Soviet Zion” in Birobidzhan apparently distributed at the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

You can read the whole pamphlet online.

zolotoivek:

Newspapers and leaflets about the Jewish Autonomous Region, 1929-1931.

  July 06, 2012 at 12:31pm via zolotoivek

zolotoivek:

Jewish Young Pioneers, 1930’s.

In the Jewish Autonomous Region.

Birobidzhan

yiddishwordoftheweek:

For those interested, Birobidzhan (between the rivers of Bira and Bidzhan) is a territory in the far eastern reaches of the Former Soviet Union (right near the border with China) which was designated a Yidishe Avtonomne Gegnt (יידישע אווטאנאמנע געגנט) - Jewish Autonomous Region - by the Soviet Union in 1934 and in which Yiddish was spoken as the official language (wouldn’t it be awesome if the main street in your hometown were Sholem Aleichem Street?). While it never quite attained its goal of becoming the center of Jewish settlement in Russia (a kind of Soviet Zion), it grew impressively, both in population and in cultural output, in the years before and immediately following World War II.

Today, the Jewish community there is small, but organizations like the Far Eastern Research Center for Jewish Culture and Yiddish, in partnership with Bar-Ilan and other universities (including East Asian ones), have been trying to preserve and grow Yiddish culture there once more (see the special issue of Afn Shvel dedicated to Birobidzhan and the virtual tour available here). Among its several activities, the Center organized two successive summer programs for Yiddish studies in Birobidzhan in 2007 and 2008, publishes the journal Mizrekh: Jewish Studies in the Far East, hosts academic conferences dedicated to exploring Jewish culture in the region, and maintains a bibliography of sources relating to the history of Birobidzhan. Check it out!

The Jewish Autonomous Region by D. Bergelson (1939)

A pamphlet about the “Soviet Zion” in Birobidzhan apparently distributed at the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

You can read the whole pamphlet online.

(via Stephanie Comfort)

Jews on their way to Birobidzhan, Jewish Autonomous Region, Russia.

vladislava:

Flag of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast (Евре́йская автоно́мная о́бласть)

Soviet authorities established the autonomous oblast in 1934. It was the result of Joseph Stalin’s nationality policy, which allowed for the Jews of the Soviet Union to receive a territory in which to pursue Yiddish cultural heritage within a socialist framework.